Blog Tour, Thriller

The Desire Card by Lee Matthew Goldberg – Blog Tour

‘Any wish fulfilled for the right price. That’s the promise the organization behind The Desire Card gives to its elite clients – but sometimes the price may be more menacing than anyone could ever imagine.

Harrison Stockton has lived an adult life of privilege and excess: a high-powered job on Wall Street fuels his fondness for alcohol and pills at the expense of a family he has no time for. Quite suddenly all of this comes crashing to a halt when he loses his job and at the same time discovers he almost certainly has only months left to live.

Desperate, and with seemingly nowhere else left to turn, Harrison activates his Desire Card. What follows is a gritty and gripping quest that takes him from New York City to the slums of Mumbai and forces him to take chances, and make decisions, he never thought he’d ever have to face. When his moral descent threatens his wife and children, Harrison must decide whether to save himself at any cost, or do what’s right and break his bargain with the mysterious group behind The Desire Card.

The Desire Card is a taut fast-paced thriller, from internationally acclaimed author Lee Matthew Goldberg, that explores what a man will do to survive when money isn’t always enough to get everything he desires.

I do love a fast paced thriller and The Desire Card definitely falls into that category. It’s fair to say the main protagonist, Harrison, has had better times . A combination of long hours on Wall Street and after-work partying means that his kids are barely speaking to him, his marriage is on the rocks and he’s ill. In fact he’s much, much sicker than he realises. His problems come to a head when he’s let go from his job. As a softener, his boss gives him a Desire Card – a small card with a button that he can press and request anything he wants, for a price.

To take his mind off things, he decides to ask for a woman. And from that night he spends with her in a hotel room, his problems spiral and spiral. He ends up heading to Mumbai in a bid to solve his health issue and the author really does not spare him – it’s really not his day, week or year.

This is gritty and graphic and in many ways (despite the modern setting and use of technology) it’s a little old fashioned – an old school thriller with pace and action. My one complaint is that the female characters weren’t massively developed, but it kept me glued to a sun lounger and if taut thrillers are your scene, it’s a good holiday read.

The Desire Card is available now in ebook and paperback. I received a free copy for this blog tour in return for an honest review. Please do visit the other excellent bloggers on this tour, as shown below.

Blog Tour, Non fiction

The A to Z of Skateboarding by Tony Hawks – Blog Tour

For more than twenty years, Tony Hawks has been mistaken for Tony Hawk, the American skateboarder. Even though it is abundantly clear on his website that he is an English comedian and author, people still write to him asking the best way to do a kickflip or land a melon.

One mischievous day he started writing back in a pompous tone, goading his correspondents for their spelling mistakes and poor grammar, while offering bogus or downright silly advice on how to improve their skateboarding.

Featuring entries on Pain, Disappointment, Underachievers, Quorn and the Vatican, this is his A to Z guide to the world of skateboarding, as seen through the eyes of someone who knows absolutely nothing about it.

I was delighted to receive this copy of Tony Hawks’ latest book as part of a blog tour for two reasons. Firstly, his debut book, Round Ireland With A Fridge is still one of my favourite non-fiction books of all time, and secondly I have a similar problem to him. My email correspondents don’t think that they are contacting a famous person, just someone with the same name as the person they really wanted, but man are they persistent. I’ve been offered nursing shifts in a Denver hospital, a property to rent in Florida, the chance to join a class action law suit and a fishing licence in Maine. So I was intrigued to see how Tony handled being mistaken for the skateboarding legend that is Tony Hawk.

WILL FLORIDA BE INCLUDED IN ANY OF YOU TOURING EVENTS?
IF SO, WHICH CITIES.
THANKS WILLIE

Florida, no. Bexhill-on-Sea, yes. Any use to you?
TH

This is different to Round Ireland With A Fridge, which was written in a narrative style. This book is a fun compendium of facts about skateboarding, wholly inaccurate musings about skateboarding and completely random and acerbic advice for the misguided skateboarding unfortunates that decided to email him. It’s a perfect loo-shelf gift for someone with a very dry sense of humour and as much knowledge of skateboarding as Tony, who’d like a book they can flip through. If you like Joe Lycett’s style of email response, this could well be up your street.

The A to Z of Skateboarding is out now in hardback, published by Unbound, £9.99. I received a free copy in exchange for an honest review as part of this blog tour. Please do visit the fabulous bloggers on the tour as shown below.

Non fiction

Critical by Dr Matt Morgan – Review

I read and watch a lot of medical stuff, as my family will attest. They regularly wander in to see me munching on a sandwich while watching a documentary on surgery, so I’ve clearly got a strong stomach for all things hospital related. The basic problem, however, for any doctor wanting to write a medical memoir these days is Henry Marsh’s Do No Harm. His thoughtful, reflective account of his career as a neurosurgeon, where he could both save a person’s life or cause untold damage, absolutely raised the bar in medical memoirs. It’s astonishingly candid and extremely thought provoking (I, for one, know that I could absolutely not take on that level of responsibility).

Since then, I’ve read umpteen medical books but nothing has hit the Henry Marsh spot. Until now. Dr Matt Morgan’s explanation of the twilight world of intensive care, mixes explanation, case history and reflective thoughts on what it’s like to work on the very sickest patients. Thoughtful, compassionate, insightful, realistic and hopeful – if you like this genre of book this should definitely be on your ‘to read’ pile. If it’s not on the Wellcome Prize shortlist next time round I’ll be amazed. Highly recommended.

My next medical foray will be into the world of David Nott, whose book War Doctor has been on my wish list for some time. He also did a fantastic Desert Island Discs episode, here.

Dr Matt Morgan’s Critical is available now. I read a NetGalley edition provided in return for an honest review.

Crime, Fiction

The Seven Deaths of Evelyn Hardcastle by Stuart Turton – Agatha on Acid

This book is insane. Stuart Turton said in his author’s note that he wanted to write something inspired by Agatha Christie, but this is Agatha Christie on a mix of steroids and acid with a Groundhog Day chaser. It’s a melange of classic stately home murder and supernatural twists. If you make it to the end, I think it will definitely stick with you.

The narrator lives the same day over and over again, waking up each in day in the body of a different person in the cast of characters who are attending a house party in a stately home. The only way he can escape this living nightmare is to solve the murder of the daughter of the family that owns the house, Evelyn Hardcastle. 

If that’s not enough, as well as the book having multiple characters narrating the book, it spools back and forth between them at different times of the day. 

The blurb on the copy I have has praise from some top authors and I can completely see why. It’s clever, it’s original, it’s gripping and it’s got more twists than an Alpine pass. But man, it’s a hard read. I’d recommend having the cast of characters by your side as you read it, and maybe even making notes. It’s so complicated. Not one to read late at night when you’re tired, or after a large wine – you need to give it your full attention. If you’re prepared, I think you’ll appreciate the cleverness of the plot, but this is not a light read. I gave it four stars, and looking on Amazon there are lots of one star reviews and lots of five star reviews. I can completely see why. Rejoice in the plotting mastery, but I’ll need something a little easier for my next read and a long lie down.

This review is of a purchased copy.

Blog Tour, Crime, Thriller

The Killer You Know by S. R. Masters – Blog Tour Review

I’m delighted to be joining the blog tour for this new psychological thriller and debut novel by S. R. Masters. He’s woven a well crafted story centring around a group of five friends who, as teenagers in the late 90s, do all the things teens do – hang around their small village, drink illicit alcohol, hole up at the house of the kid whose parents are out the most and let their overactive imaginations create all sorts of stories about the adults around them. And like all teenagers they spend hours talking about their futures – for one a career in medicine, for another a longing to be an actor, and for Will, the one teen who really can’t think what to do – a joke that one day he might become a serial killer.

You need to kill at least three people to be a serial killer, right? So that’s what I’ll do.

The author flips the story between the late 90s and 2015, when one of the group contacts the others and suggests a reunion. By this time, Adeline, the main narrator for the 2015 segments of the book, has a terrible relationship with her parents and is reluctant to come back to her childhood home. But she’s proud of her popular podcast series on movies, and deciding that’s something she can talk about with the others, she agrees to come home for Christmas and get together for old time’s sake. Although the group are happy to be reunited, Will is a no show, and eventually their thoughts turn to what he said about his future when they were younger. Thus begins a search to see what had happened to Will, and if he could possibly have carried out what they thought were idle threats.

This book swaps between time periods and narrators, so does take a little bit of concentration, but it’s well worth the effort. It’s a cleverly woven narrative and I really liked that the protagonists had very different adult lives, which all played into the story in different ways. S. R. Masters also puts plenty of doubt into your mind as to how the story will pan out, and peels away the layers of the plot deliberately and carefully. My overriding sense from this book is of the oppressiveness of the tiny village in which the group grew up, where everyone knows everyone else’s business, prejudices and connections, and how this carries through into the teenagers’ futures. A strong long form debut from an author who has written a lot of short stories, and I’m looking forward to seeing what he comes out with next.

This review is of an advance copy, provided in exchange for an honest review. Please do visit the other blogs on tour, as shown below. The Killer You Know is out now in paperback and ebook.

Fiction

The Seven or Eight Deaths of Stella Fortuna by Juliet Grames – Review

It is, perhaps, best to start by saying what Stella Fortuna isn’t. The title might suggest it’s one of those Groundhog Day type books where the same events happen over and over again until something jolts the plot into a new outcome. This is not that book. The Seven or Eight Deaths of Stella Fortuna is the story of one woman’s life and family, over the broad sweep of around a hundred years, from the early 20th century until the present day.

I have come to understand Stella as a woman of incredible will and strength, of charisma, of innate intelligence. She was not a woman of her time, and she was made to pay a high price for her unwillingness to conform.

Stella Fortuna is born into a poor family in rural Italy, and her dilemma is that she simply will not conform to the expectations of her family and community as a woman, a wife and a mother. Her name of ‘lucky star’ proves to be more of a curse than a blessing, and as the title suggests she experiences many near-death misfortunes in her long life, both in Italy and America. Cheering this book is not (there are some dark themes) – but it’s utterly believable, compelling, and so, so beautifully written. You can’t help but wish the best for Stella, who pushes back when both fate and family seem so keen to break her.

Every so often I break out from my normal diet of non fiction and thrillers and settle into a slower paced read. At 438 pages, this is a pretty long, rich, tasting menu of a book which deserves to be savoured. The narrator (whose identity is not revealed until much later in the book) draws you in, settles you by the fire and tells you Stella’s story with so much depth and detail you’ll believe you’re in an Italian village eating minestra. To me, it had vibes of The Hundred-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out of the Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson although clearly in a very different setting – think of that huge sweep through history seen through one person’s eyes. Take your time over this one, it’s really worth it. I was sad to end it, but I know exactly which friend it’s going to next.

The Seven or Eight Deaths of Stella Fortuna by Juliet Grames is published on 7th May 2019. This review is of an advance copy provided in return for an honest review.

Thriller

A Single Source by Peter Hanington – Review

Peter Hanington is a BBC journalist and this shows very strongly in his new thriller, A Single Source. The book is set in the Arab Spring of 2011 and follows three parallel tracks. The main track is around a BBC journalist called William Carver and his colleague Patrick, who are sent to Cairo to cover the unfolding events there, but there are subsidiary plot strands involving two brothers so desperate to leave Eritrea and find a better future in Europe that they are prepared to undertake a hugely dangerous journey, and a former BBC editor who has now changed sides and is working in the press office of the Ministry of Defence.

Carver is a maverick, old school journalist who is a luddite when it comes to technology but has a nose for a story and for finding the best sources. A brilliant story comes to him, but he only has a single source, and with forces trying to push him off course he fights a battle to get the story on air.

The writing around the fictionalised version of the Arab Spring is very evocative and I very much enjoyed reading a journalist’s view of what was unfolding and how it was reported. Hanington’s BBC credentials mean that this is wholly believable and authentic (sometimes too much so, as some of his references to Broadcasting House are a bit niche). Carver is a hugely flawed character, but you can’t help rooting for him. I felt the plot strand involving the brothers from Eritrea was a little neglected – although the description of their journey was heartbreaking, I felt the weaving in of this to the main plot was underdone. Overall though, a really good and educational read, and understandably praised by many other journalists.

This review is of a NetGalley edition, that I received for free in return for an honest review. A Single Source by Peter Hanington is published on 2nd May 2019.

Fiction, Thriller

Stone Mothers by Erin Kelly – Review

Such a cleverly plotted and worked book. Erin Kelly’s story revolves around a “stone mother” – a Victorian asylum that has, as so many others, been converted into flats. This is a psychological thriller which weaves together families and mothers with the history of the hospital, and which works its way back in time, peeling off layers to get to the core of the story. Prepare to be led down literal and plot corridors as Kelly navigates us through the generations. I read this in one extremely long sitting, I simply couldn’t put it down. Highly recommended and perfect bank holiday reading.

Fiction, Thriller

The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides – Review

I read this in two sittings and wow. Just wow. A brilliant psychological thriller that totally had me until the final page. Theo Faber is a psychotherapist who begins working in a secure unit. He becomes somewhat obsessed with cracking the case of Alicia, who had murdered her husband and never uttered a word since. Theo is convinced that his skills could bring her speech back and help her move forward, but as he slowly unpicks the circumstances leading up to the murder, his own life starts to unravel. These two plot strands move side by side through the novel as Theo gets deeper and deeper into trying to work out what happened to Alice and her husband.

An utter and complete page turner with an astounding twist. I’ve read that others saw the twist coming, but I guess that might depend how you read a thriller. Sometimes the twist is obvious, but for my part I try not too hard to second guess what’s coming as I genuinely want to be surprised. In this case, i didn’t think it was at all jumping off the page – Michaelides really weaves all the strands together brilliantly. I absolutely could not put it down. Alex Michaelides is also a screenwriter (this is being made into a film) and I think it really shows – the plot is so strong and the dialogue completely believable. Bravo – an amazing debut novel.

This review is of a purchased copy.

Blog Tour, Crime

The Killer In Me by Olivia Kiernan – Blog Blast Review

As a crime fiction fan, there’s absolutely nothing better than discovering a new author who writes brilliant police procedurals. It’s like Christmas and birthday all rolled into one, with someone turning up with a giant portion of your favourite cake for good measure (carrot cake, please). For some reason, Olivia Kiernan’s first book (Too Close To Breathe, now out in paperback) had passed me by, so my first acquaintance with Dublin-based DCS Frankie Sheehan was her second outing.

As a reader, I’m really picky in my crime fiction – I want believable protagonists, a tight plot and something that hooks me from the off and keeps me guessing. The Killer In Me ticks all those boxes, with an attention grabbing start as DCS Sheehan faces two huge challenges: solving a horrific double murder and dealing with pressure from a family member to look into a potential miscarriage of justice 15 years previously. The setting will bring a familiar feeling to Tana French fans as the action all happens in and around Dublin, but it’s definitely faster paced than, say, French’s The Wych Elm. Kiernan keeps the pace and the tension high and I whizzed through it, compelled to see how the two plot strands unwound.

Too Close to Breathe, the first DCS Sheehan book, is now out in paperback

Let’s hope there’s a third book in the pipeline somewhere, because this has the makings of a really strong police procedural series. I went straight out and bought Too Close to Breathe and read it immediately afterwards, which hopefully tells you how much of a fan I am.

Many thanks to riverrun, Quercus Books and NetGalley for the advance copy provided in return for my honest review, and for the invitation to take part in the Blog Blast. The Killer In Me is published on 4th April in hardback. Please do check in with the others on this blog blast, listed below.